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Showing posts from 2017

My development blogging & communication review 2017

In my first annual reflection on my development blogging engagement in 2011 I stated quite plainly: Development blogging has become part of narrative writing for those who work in, study or care about international aid.
A year later, in 2012, Radi-Aid, One Laptop Per Child and musings about development being stuck ‘indoors’ appeared in my post; aid satire, techno-solutionism and challenges around conferences and meetings are still very much on today’s critical agenda as well.
In 2013 I was quite enthusiastic about starting my communication for development position in Sweden as social media were anchored in my academic research and outreach.
Issues of 2014, including poor NGO communication (Tony Blair winning a humanitarian award), voluntourism (Nick Kristof traveling abroad) and how new forms of philanthrocapitalism are influencing #globaldev almost seem like timeless classics now…
In 2015 I was excited about new forms of humanitarian journalism (IRIN!), the fact that aid worker well-b…

Links & Contents I Liked 263

Hi all,

Welcome to one of the final link reviews of 2017!

It's an interesting mix this week featuring public lectures, (visual) communication of development & #MeToo reflections in academia.

Development news: Rise in global arms sales; private companies spying on activists; Jeremy Corbyn speaks at the UN on global governance; UNHCR's Melissa Fleming speaks about home & refugees; how to 'empower women'? How to engage cynical audiences in #globaldev? How to ensure ethical photography? How to write better about social issues; new podcast series from India.

Publications: Local aid workers & digital marginalization; doing development differently.

Academia: #MeToo; what is the purpose of societies & associations?

Enjoy!

New from aidnography

Third World Quarterly & the case for colonialism debate
This is a curated and regularly updated overview over the events that followed after the publication of Bruce Gilley's article The Case for Colonialism in the journa…

Third World Quarterly & the case for colonialism debate

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This is a curated and regularly updated overview over the events that followed after the publication of Bruce Gilley's article The Case for Colonialism in the journal Third World Quarterly.

I have maintained a Storify about this topic since September 2017, but since Storify announced its end of life for May 2018 I recreated the developments in this blog post.
This post will be updated if and when new articles, comments etc. appear, but my original Storify will not be updated.

The original article is no longer available on the journal's website:
This Viewpoint essay has been withdrawn at the request of the academic journal editor, and in agreement with the author of the essay. Following a number of complaints, Taylor & Francis conducted a thorough investigation into the peer review process on this article. Whilst this clearly demonstrated the essay had undergone double-blind peer review, in line with the journal's editorial policy, the journal editor has subsequently recei…